Albums of the Decade 2010-2019, Part 4 (10 – 1)

Here we are. The best ten albums to see release between the years 2010 and 2019. These are the sort of albums that will appeal to any metalhead, regardless of usual genre preferences. Classics. All of them.

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10) Skeletal Remains – Devouring Mortality
Dark Descent – 2018

You could crack your neck headbanging to it. You could dislocate fingers trying to emulate its solos. It’s brutal without ignorant chug. It’s technical without gratuitous fret masturbation. And at all times it remains as old school as a slate chalkboard. This album single-handedly gives me hope for the death metal genre. Every year puts up good albums. Sometimes even a great one surfaces. But I was worried that the days of the mind-meltingly phenomenal were gone. This allays all my fears.

9) Bliss Signal – Bliss Signal
Profound Lore – 2018

You won’t find a more satisfyingly immersive listening experience. The successful combination of evocative black metal with the primal electric hum of grime results in an almost trance-inducing state. It’s an album that pushes the limits of its stylistic roots far past expectations; it’s as far as removed from Mayhem as it is from Dizzee Rascal. But in finding this previously undiscovered musical niche, Bliss Signal have become a will-o-the-wisp, irresistibly luring us far off the beaten path.

8) Spirit Adrift – Divided by Darkness
20 Buck Spin – 2019

Divided by Darkness has some of the most infectious riffs ever put to wax; a rhythmic pathogen with truly pandemic potential. Spirit Adrift sit right on that cusp between true heavy metal and epic doom metal, so they’re able to get huge sounding guitars that move with implacable purpose but are able to simultaneously linger and luxuriate. I’m not sure exactly how it’s possible for one album to be both immoveable object and irresistible force, but this legendary juggernaut is absolutely both.

7) Prurient – Frozen Niagara Falls
Profound Lore – 2015

Channelling the long held ascetic notion of transcendence through suffering, Prurient’s ninety minute monster of an album stretches the limits of what can rightfully be considered noise to deliver sixteen tracks that cleanse the soul with fire then clad it in glorious white. The looped synths, heavy distortion, and screeching feedback allow the listener to enter a truly meditative state, despite being absolutely and unrepentantly punishing to the ears. Challenging and almost overwhelming, yet wondrously sublime.

6) SubRosa – More Constant tham the Gods
Profound Lore – 2013

I struggle to think of any other band in the stoner doom world that operates at the level of sophistication that SubRosa does. They present emotionally challenging themes without dumbing down their real world complexity. And rather than just plucking the heartstrings and letting it reverb, the band dare to fill their scores with as much life musically as they have thematically. This is an album that was great on release, but has aged spectacularly because of the dynamism the band challenged themselves to play.

5) Daughters – You Won’t Get What You Want
Ipecac – 2018

What is immediately clear here is that when Daughters decided to do a new album, their original shouty, jarring brand of noise rock wouldn’t cut it anymore. What they delivered is swooning, anxious, complicated, and absolutely enthralling. It’s an album that understands, at a fundamental level, all the things that scratch and irritate the psyche. As such, you can’t exactly call it a comfortable listen, but it’s almost impossible to turn off. It’s a masterpiece of emotive songwriting.

4) Devin Townsend – Empath
InsideOut – 2019

What we have here is prog at its most organic sounding. In many respects this comes across as a stream of febrile consciousness. All the transitions, exclamations, and assorted oddities flow into each other and somehow make total sense. It’s like Devin is channelling his inner James Joyce and this is his Ulysses. Don’t underestimate the strangeness; Devin has pushed his sound far out to sea on this. But as overwhelming as it can sound, the raw and joyous humanity on display will fill you with light.

3) Ihsahn – Àmr
Candlelight – 2018

In what may well be the best album he has ever done, Ihsahn has delivered a bleakly captivating dissertation on isolation, loneliness, and depression. There are moments that genuinely cut deep into the soul, where the emptiness at the core of existence is so clear and unquestionable that it hurts. The challenging themes are backed up with a progressive score that is free-wheeling and compelling; it demands to be heard, but its arrogance is well-deserved and hard-earned.

2) Triptykon – Eparistera Daimones
Century Media – 2010

The acrimonious break up of Celtic Frost is the fuel that feeds this raging inferno. I know that Thomas Fischer is on the record about needing a certain level of discord in his life to get the most out of his creativity, but I didn’t think that it was humanly possible for one man to hate as deeply as he does. This is more than simple invective; this is an invocation of anger so profound that if magic were real, a certain former drummer would cease to exist. It’s power is stunning and transcendent on all levels.

1) Cobalt – Slow Forever
Profound Lore – 2016

“In such condition there is no place for industry, because the fruit thereof is uncertain, and consequently no culture of the earth, no navigation nor the use of commodities that may be imported by sea, no commodious building, no instruments of moving and removing such things as require much force, no knowledge of the face of the earth, no account of time, no arts, no letters, no society, and which is worst of all, continual fear and danger of violent death, and the life of man, solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short.”
– Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan (1651)

Hobbes was making his case for a mighty ruler by bleakly positing what he considered the natural state of mankind. He genuinely believed that strong, unified control would alleviate this brutish state of nature. However, even if you subscribe to this vision of totalitarian necessity, you also have to acknowledge that life isn’t that simple. Humanity falls through cracks in society all the time. Cobalt understand this; that even in this society we have built to shelter us from ourselves, it’s all too common for people to slip through, to re-enter the state of nature. Slow Forever is replete with a grubby, grasping desperation that is absolutely terrifying because of its raw humanity. This is music of the lost, of the outsider, of people stripped of all but existence. Its struggles are visceral and its desires are violent. It exposes the uncomfortable truth that society is the lie we tell ourselves to hide our all too animal nature from each other. Listen to this and feed your beast.

Albums of the Decade 2010-2019, Part 3 (40-11)

Part 3 of 4. Getting ever closer to the top of the tree. The bands that have got themselves this far have truly produced some amazing work to get here. Not just to beat out the previous 60 acts, but to also beat out the 100s of great albums that almost made the list. For the record, if I’m asked why [insert album here] isn’t in the top 100, it came in at 101.

As usual, enjoy.

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40) Inter Arma – Paradise Gallows
Relapse – 2016

Crushingly heavy. I swear, I’m going to overuse that phrase, but it’s so useful. And there’s a surprising amount of room to move with it. For example, Paradise Gallows is akin to being caught in one of those moveable wall traps. Think the garbage pit scene from Star Wars, except it doesn’t stop. It’s implacable and remorseless in its attack on your ears. The combination of sludge and drone, held together with blackened threads, is a methodical juggernaut. It cares not for what’s in its path.

39) Nadja – Sonnborner
Broken Spine Productions – 2018

I still find the pacing of this album thoroughly confusing. Opening with that titanic, 30 minute track, then following up with a handful of significantly shorter songs is odd. And, yet, it works so well. They present drone in a way that’s beautiful in a haunting sort of way. The distortion and the sustains warm the soul. And then it transitions to a more up-tempo approach, which breaks the reverie and re-engages the listener with reality. It’s a welcome reinterpretion of the genre.

38) Esoteric – A Pyrrhic Existence
Season of Mist – 2019

Is this actually slow? It seems pretty damn fast in places. The confusion is pretty intense. The thing you have to realise is that Esoteric have hit that terminal point of heaviness. The singularity. Black hole density. Listening to A Pyrrhic Existence puts you firmly past the event horizon and time starts to distort, to lose meaning. It’s satisfyingly weird to have something so crushingly heavy yet dexterously mercurial. It gave me a fresh insight into how funeral doom can shift within its own boundaries. Innovation can be a jovian weight to bear.

37) Batushka – Litourgiya
Witching Hour Productions – 2015

May the metal gods continue to bless the black metal drama machine and keep its cogs oiled and toothsome, because I would never have discovered this gem of an album if the band didn’t go the full Gorgoroth. Whatever your opinion on the acrimony, there’s no denying that Litourgiya is the work of a very skilled band. The interplay between Eastern Orthodox liturgical music and black metal is thoroughly engaging. I wanted, no, needed to keep listening to it; I had to unravel all its hidden truths.

36) Pissgrave – Posthumous Humiliation
Profound Lore – 2019

Death metal, by its very nature, has a certain degree of inherent violence. It’s up to each band to decide how exactly they want to channel it and how they want it dressed. Pissgrave come at the violence with absolutely zero artifice. Their approach is horrifyingly stark. There’s no attempt abstract or obfuscate their aggression; they lay it out naked and unadorned for the world to recoil from. To listen to it is to allow yourself to be dehumanised. It’s sadistic in a way that defies description.

35) Kvelertak – Kvelertak
Indie – 2010

When this came out in 2010 I had no idea how much I would want it. Then I got a taste of their faintly blackened, definitely over the top punk rock hullabaloo and it’s an album that’s been on regular rotation ever since. It’s got punch in the face tempos, ridiculous hooks, and the catchiest damn Norwegian lyrics ever. I don’t understand a word being yelled, but I yell right along with it. Or at least as well as my understanding of phonics will let me. I still get that rush every time it kicks off.

34) Lxs Jugadxs – Demo 2015
Self-Released – 2015

I very nearly cheated and put down all three of their demos in one entry. They’re a hell of an act. But doing that would undersell how good these four songs actually are. They’re a whirlwind of absolute madness, forever threatening to completely tear itself apart but always hanging on by the loosest of frayed threads. That the closing track feels so titanic at just under two minutes is indicative of just how brilliantly wild the preceding three tracks were. I hope they continue to play and release material.

33) Today is the Day – Pain is a Warning
Black Market Activities – 2011

One of my go-to albums for getting amped all the way up. It’s not just that it’s an energetic exercise in noise rock; it’s that it’s so smartly delivered. The slow passages brood with barely constrained intensity, the fast movements drive with pulsating dynamism, the clean vocals croon with genuine soul, and the harsh vocals are like acid, hallucinatory and corrosive, on the ear drums. It’s a sonic package so expertly delivered that it continues to surprise and amaze years after release.

32) Blood Incantation – Starspawn
Dark Descent – 2016

No band does death metal like Blood Incantation. They work at an intensity level that deliberately pushes them far outside conventional comfort limits. They take hostility and magnify it to apocalyptic rage. They take dread and amplify it to chthonic horror. And they take bloodlust and warp it into a febrile, extrasensory longing that can never be satiated. Starspawn attacks you and it’s up to you to endure it. It’s unhinged and does what it wants. Such a monstrosity is something that needs celebrating.

31) Napalm Death – Apex Predator – Easy Meat
Century Media – 2015

That the grindfathers of grindcore have released an album of this vitality so far into their career is testament to their relentless drive and commitment to their message and to their craft. It’s not just that they blast incendiary beats as hard as they can; it’s that they’re willing to throw in curveballs for the listener. The industrial vibe of album’s title track and the oozing sleaze of Dear Slum Landlord… are prime examples. It’s a furious album that indulges in the many faces of anger.

30) Alcest – Les Voyages De L’Âme
Prophecy – 2012

Alcest are probably my favourite practitioners of blackgaze and Les Voyages de L’âme is definitely my favourite album. It perfects the interplay between shoegaze and black metal. The songs are written with a beautiful, dreamy ambience that fills the sonic space with light. But that light, glorious and blinding, casts long, inky shadows. In those shadows lurk beasts, sharpened fangs, and razor claws. An insatiable hunger lies at the heart of this album and all the splendour does is mask its ravenous intent.

29) Leprous – Malina
InsideOut – 2017

Malina is possibly the most depressing album on this list but certainly the most beautiful. Leprous have taken inspiration from a piece of bleak and oblique Austrian literature and transformed it into a gorgeously affecting prog opus. Heavily syncopated, the album conveys a necessary level of turmoil and unrest without sacrificing narrative flow. And I cannot think of a better vocalist for this than Einar. His contra-tenor is thematically perfect. Sad, sensitive, wonderful.

28) Bell Witch – Four Phantoms
Profound Lore – 2015

I still struggle to reconcile the sheer power of this album to the fact it’s a two piece: bass, drums, vocals, that’s it. It’s so heavy that it sets everything nearby rattling; so much so that you can’t play it subtly. If it’s on, you will feel it. But the amazing physical phenomena on display pales in comparison to the music itself. Yes, it’s heavy, but it’s delivered with such a deft touch that it transcends funeral doom. It creates a hypnotic effect where the crushing weight traps and holds the light.

27) Primordial – Where Greater Men Have Fallen
Metal Blade – 2014

Soaring, majestic, and strident, Where Greater Men Have Fallen is a stirring lament to the modern ills of this world. It has the requisite level of bitterness for this style of black metal, but it’s delivered as a call to action; Primordial don’t want the listener to passively mourn the what-ifs of this existence, they want people to be pissed off and engaged with their rage. This dynamism and purpose is truly what sets them apart. They want compatriots not witnesses.

26) High on Fire – Luminiferous
eOne – 2015

An unstoppable beast of an album, Luminiferous sounds like nothing less than an out of control freight train made entirely out of thunder. There’s no second guesses and no chance to over-think things; there are only titanic riffs rolling over everything in their path. And the beauty of it all is that this is not a simple album. There’s a sophistication to it that is only enhanced by the rampaging juggernaut beat down it inflicts. It leaves you with things to think about once you’re standing and have found your teeth.

25) Horrendous – Anareta
Dark Descent – 2015

I think the highest possible praise I can give to Horrendous here is that Anareta gives me the same satisfaction that Leprosy does. Yep, I’m comparing them to Death. While they are very much their own band with their own approach, the end result is an album that marries visceral intensity with distinctive technical flourishes and is delivered with passion and an ear for the listener. In that regard, it’s very similar to a certain, dearly departed Floridian’s oeuvre. A classic album born of legendary roots.

24) Bölzer – Hero
Iron Bonehead – 2016

The moment the intro track, Urðr, starts, you know you’re listening to something different. Something special. It somehow succeeds in being extremely traditional black metal and a wholly new approach to the genre all at once. It burns as brightly as the most powerful stars in the sky, but is kept grounded by a chill groove that is unusual stylistically yet thoroughly welcome. It’s an album of contrasts, as the band juggle the infernal and the mortal. It’s a remarkable album from a remarkable band.

23) Watain – Lawless Darkness
Season of Mist – 2010

Stirring anthems and soaring choruses aren’t just for power metal, you know. Done right, they have a happy home in any genre, irrespective of how ordinarily abrasive it usually is. This is an excellent thing for Watain, who have approached their proselytising for the Dark Lord with both the fire of abject zealotry and the huge hooks of stadium rock. Some may cry “FALSE!” Fuck ’em. As devotees of darkness, they understand that preaching to the choir is reductive and self-defeating. Darkness for all!

22) Enforcer – Diamonds
Earache – 2010

As great as this album is, it still manages to sound like a deliciously guilty pleasure. On a technical level, it’s brilliantly delivered speed metal. Driving rhythms, killer riffs, memorable vocals, the whole deal. But then you get to what it is thematically and it is gloriously lurid. High stakes gambling and swordfights on the neon-washed streets of Tokyo seems to be the narrative they were aiming for, but they also threw in a liberal dose of the devil. It’s utter madness and it all the better for it.

21) Trap Them – Darker Handcraft
Prosthetic – 2011

The absolute kings of Entombedcore and the high priests of HM2 worship, Trap Them took a chainsaw approach to their punk, creating an unmistakably hellish racket in doing so. Nothing exemplifies this as much as Darker Handcraft. Once again, you’ll find yourself in Barren Praise, the ghost town the band centre their narrative around. But this particular trip is harrowing, miserable, and dangerous. Their blend of grindcore and hardcore shouldn’t be this gloriously atmospheric, but it is.

20) Sólstafir – Ótta
Season of Mist – 2014

Winner of the “Holy Shit I Should Learn Another Language” award goes to Sólstafir. Ótta is haunting, lonely, and dripping with ennui. It’s evocative of a weary traveller crossing the tundra on a misty evening. I just wish I could match the lyrical themes to the music. The lyrical delivery is so delicate, sounding so pained yet so inviting at the same time. The emotional depths that this album plumbs transcend language barriers; I may not completely understand it, but I remain touched and enthralled throughout.

19) Altarage – Endinghent
Season of Mist – 2017

I probably overuse the word relentless. I don’t really think about that sort of thing usually, but upon revisiting Endinghent, it’s abundantly clear that I do. And shame on me for watering down the word through overuse, as no other album embodies relentlessness as completely and overwhelmingly as Altarage’s second full length. It’s as delirious and as terrifying as a fever dream in a war zone. Every beat and every riff sounds like they are trying to tear down the walls of reality. Relentless indeed.

18) Alder Glade – Spine of the World
Self-Released – 2017

It still strikes me as odd that an album so deeply rooted in Nordic heathenism could be made to such high quality by one man in Brisbane, Australia. Brisbane: the city winter forgot. But whatever journeys brought him to this point payed dividends, as Spine of the World is possessed of a true blackened aesthetic that makes you believe magic is very real and very dangerous. It helps that the magic is backed up by a unique approach to the genre. It’s crisp and sharp, like it’s been flash frozen in nitrogen.

17) Cloud Rat – Pollinator
Artoffact Records – 2019

This is nothing less than a startling vision of what grindcore could be. Of what it should be. Here is a band that is unafraid to take their fury and vitriol and wrap it in something more than blasts, shrieks, and distortion. It still has all those things, but the band unleash them with a sophistication more akin to prog or post-metal. They present their anger with as much complexity musically as there is in day to day existence. The real world isn’t simple and Cloud Rat dare to acknowledge that.

16) Revocation – Chaos of Forms
Relapse – 2011

Revocation’s signature blend of technical death metal and classic thrash was perfectly realised on Chaos of Forms. Oddly enough, I firmly believe the key to marrying the two genres together this well lies in David Davidson’s jazz background. He understands how to channel different sonic forces and wield them together to create a seemless, yet unpredictable union. In this sense, the title “Chaos of Forms” is entirely apt. Every song is a whirlwind of sound, a technical wonder and a classic banger all in one.

15) Clutch – Earth Rocker
Weathermaker Music – 2013

This is an album that never fails to get me, as they say, right in the feels. So you don’t misunderstand me, this isn’t some florid, weepy exercise in melodramatic sentimentality; rather it’s a powerful testament to healing powers of rock and roll. I never really thought about how much music has helped me get by in life until Earth Rocker stirred me up and got me assessing things. It’s an album that puts its existence up in lights and justifies the ever-living shit out of it with pure rock fury.

14) Nachtmystium – Silencing Machine
Century Media – 2012

There’s an awful lot of awful things you can say about Nachtmystium’s front man, Blake Judd. Junky, thief, and conman leap to mind. But there’s no doubt that when he channelled his self-destruction into his music instead of himself, the results were intense and inspired. Produced just before his life fell completely to shit, this is an album all about the stuttering flame of hope being snuffed out. It’s industrialised, progressive black metal at its most despairing.

13) Hacride – Back to Where You’ve Never Been
Indie – 2013

If you had asked me at the start of the decade which emotionally mature French progressive death metal act would make the most impact on me, I genuinely doubt Hacride would have been on my list. But BtWYNB is an absolute revelation. It sounds absolutely huge; the sumptuous and verdant soundscapes they create are a joy to luxuriate in. And yet, the songs are so personal, so intimate that it feels almost like an intrusion to listen to them. Their combination of hefty sonic bombast and intense emotion leaves an indelible impression.

12) Turbonegro – Sexual Harassment
Volcom – 2012

This is more than a return to form; this is a glorious, sleazy, denim-clad triumph over adversity. The Duke of Nothing on vocals isn’t Hank, but that’s the point. The ten tracks on offer require a rougher approach and that’s what he brings. Sexual Harassment doesn’t just showcase the band’s still-sparkling talent; it allows them to exorcise all the demons born of their turbulent hiatus. It makes for an unusual, yet real mix of hostility, bitterness, relief and gratitude. Catharsis sometimes requires raucous partying.

11) Swans – The Glowing Man
Young God – 2016

Come. Come to the great high mass. Give yourself to the church of sound and abase yourself upon the altar of Swans. Michael Gira’s masters of post-punk have always delivered in ritualistic, almost fevered fashion, but The Glowing Man is transcendent. It offers mania and catharsis, but it requires time and commitment. Exposing yourself fully to its complete panoply of sound is to give yourself over to a devotional that extends to almost the two hour mark, but will leave you feeling the touch of the divine.

Albums of the Year 2019

And so we round off another year. 2019 was good to us metalheads. That being said, it’s surprising how easily this top 11 coalesced.

Despite having a bumper year, full of great albums, I am but one man, so I’m going to miss things. Of the albums I definitely know I missed, these are probably my biggest laments:

Children of Bodom – Hexed
Fleshgod Apocalypse – Valeno
Insomnium – Heart Like a Grave
Leprous – Pitfalls
Mayhem – Daemon
Nile – Vile Nilotic Rites
Queensryche – The Verdict
Tool – Fear Inoculum
Torche – Admission
Chelsea Wolfe – Birth of Violence

And so, without further adieu, here’s the best damn eleven albums from 2019.

11) Nocturnus AD – Paradox

Profound Lore – 2019/05/24

What I said then: The band has lost absolutely nothing over the years; absolutely killer, high-octane death metal.
What I say now: I love the sci-fi vibe on Paradox. It doesn’t just sound technical; it sounds weird. That healthy dose of the bizarre gives the familiar Florida sound a vibrancy it sorely needs.

10) Pseudcommando – A Home Beneath the Floorboards

Sentient Ruin Laboratories – 2019/08/23

What I said then: It fills your reality with noise to the point that even the air starts to feel heavy.
What I say now: Alienating and discomforting, this remains one of the year’s toughest listens. But in the hidden depths of noise are secret whispers of melody. Of songs so bleak they must remain obscured for our sanity.

The Prurient Award for Best Album that Doesn’t Lend Itself to Easy Reviewing
Miscarriage – Imminent Horror
(Atmospheric Sludge – United States of America/Sweden)
Sentient Ruin Laboratories – 2019/02/22

image

Bit of a cheat as it was self-released in late 2018, but Sentient Ruin brought this nightmare to the surface. Hateful and misanthropic, this is a masterpiece of sonic horror.

9) Slipknot – We Are Not Your Kind

Roadrunner Records – 2019/08/09

What I said then: The band’s sound has matured, maintaining a familiar level of vitriol but has become more expansive, as befits their status as one of metal’s most bankable acts.
What I say now: The depth of talent that Slipknot have dared to incorporate is remarkable. They’ve given a sophistication to their sound without sacrificing the venom their performances are best known for.

8) Mgła – Age of Excuse

Northern Heritage – 2019/09/02

What I said then: Age of Excuse sounds as fresh and intimidating as Groza did ten years ago.
What I say now: In a year that saw merely acceptable releases from multiple black metal icons, it took these Poles to show how venomous and furious the genre can still be. They are a mighty tempest of darkness.

7) Alcest – Spiritual Instinct

Nuclear Blast -2019/10/25

What I said then: This isn’t some fae trickster or changeling; this is the wild hunt, riding high in saddle, their doomed quarry hounded by spirit and mist alike.
What I say now: There’s a fine balancing act on display here. It is undoubtedly more aggressive, but it still retains the warming dreamlike quality that makes Alcest so charming. It’s a malicious beauty.

Mariusz Lewandowski Award for Best Art
John Dyer Baizley for Gold & Grey by Baroness

I’ve always had a deep and abiding affection for Baizley’s art, but the work he put into Gold & Grey is absolutely stunning. I could look at it for hours and still find something new.

6) Death Angel – Humanicide

Nuclear Blast – 2019/05/31

What I said then: They have penned an album of thrash anthems that will absolutely stay fresh and loud in your mind.
What I say now: It’s mind-boggling how consistently fantastic Death Angel have been. You absolutely cannot complain about more of the same when everything they do is so damn good.

5) Esoteric – A Pyrrhic Existence

Season of Mist – 2019/11/08

What I said then: They’ve created a swirling void of utter despair that threatens to suck all life into its infinite depths.
What I say now: Esoteric have that wonderful ability to make funeral doom so much more than low, slow, and miserable. There is a richness of tone and a warmth to their delivery, which gives it soul.

4) Pissgrave – Posthumous Humiliation

Profound Lore – 2019/03/04

What I said then: The vocals are akin to someone drowning in acid, the guitars are like a frenzied ice-pick attack, the drums might as well be hammers swung at your joints, and the solos are like the gears of a horrifying trap grinding into action.
What I say now: These depraved degenerates can seriously play. As straight up hostile as this is, it’s only as effective as it is because they’ve honed their monstrous craft to a razor’s edge.

The Dillinger Escape Plan Memorial Award for Most Kick Ass Live Act
Behemoth

In a year with ample competition, Behemoth stood taller than all the others. They have a flair for the dramatic, blast harder than they do on wax, and and curate a fantastic live set. It’s metal maximised to the limit.

3) Cloud Rat – Pollinator

Gilead Media – 2019/09/13

What I said then: It’s the vast vista of humanity with all its foibles and tumults, but sped up to the bpm of a stressed hummingbird’s heartbeat and viewed through an obscuring heat shimmer of pure ferocity.
What I say now: Cloud Rat have always been building to something. All that energy. All that drive. All that passion. It all led to this: a humanity affirmation wrapped in a blistering assault.

2) Spirit Adrift – Divided by Darkness

20 Buck Spin – 2019/05/10

What I said then: They’ve forged a path to greatness and paved it with talent.
What I say now: Spirit Adrift tap into the same heavy metal wellspring that made Sabbath essential. Heavy and melodic with bone-shaking rhythms, but done in a way that’s 100% fresh. Old school remade anew.

1) Devin Townsend – Empath

InsideOut – 2019/03/29

What I said then: Proving that any emotion delivered stridently enough can provide an intense experience, Empath is a manic blast of over-the-top positivity.
What I say now: I reckon it’s impossible to not love this. It radiates an aura of chaos that in no way diminishes the pulsating good vibes. To be so unabashedly in your face but with all smiles is unique.

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So that was 2019. Stay tuned for my Top 100 of the past decade.

December 2019 Review Round Up

Happy 2020, everybody. December turned out to be far more distracting than I thought it would. I figured I’d get the one or two things I missed, have a short month, and finalise my lists. Nope. It blew out a bit. Shouldn’t complain though; turns out I missed a lot of good stuff.

Best of the lot was Esoteric’s long awaited A Pyrrhic Existence. It’s a gruelling exercise in funeral doom, but it’s like running an ultramarathon; the pain is worth the endorphin rush at the end.

Next month is my Best of 2019 and Best of the Decade lists. Not sure if I’ll publish monthly reviews on top. We’ll see how we go.

As always, feel free to hit me on Facebook.

Until next month \m/

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Album of the Month
Esoteric – A Pyrrhic Existence
(Funeral Doom – United Kingdom)
Season of Mist – 2019/11/08

It’s been a long time between drinks, but good God am I glad Esoteric are back. I’m also glad they took the time, because it’s clear that found a way to make their already titanic sound even bigger, darker, and more funereal. They’ve created a swirling void of utter despair that threatens to suck all life into its infinite depths.

The Rest in Alphabetical Order
Abigail Williams – Walk Beyond the Dark
(Black Metal – United States of America)
Blood Music – 2019/11/15

I’ve never truly known what to expect from Abigail Williams, but I’m more than happy to settle for surprisingly complex black metal. I say surprisingly because this initially seems to be very traditional, but the deeper you go, the more you listen to it, the broader its influences becomes clear. For something so dense, it’s pretty seamless.

Alcest – Spiritual Instinct
(Blackgaze – France)
Nuclear Blast – 2019/10/25

Good to see Neige put a little bit more black into his blackgaze. It still has the dreamy otherness that has been his signature throughout this project, but it’s an angrier sort of dream. A lucid nightmare. This isn’t some fae trickster or changeling; this is the wild hunt, riding high in saddle, their doomed quarry hounded by spirit and mist alike.

Blood Incantation – Hidden History of the Human Race
(Death Metal – United States of America)
Dark Descent – 2019/11/22

If you wondered what the History Channel at 1am would sound like as death metal, here’s your answer. In order to examine the aliens as masters theme, the band have dialled back the chaos in favour of a more atmospheric approach. They’re still Blood Incantation though. What they do is intensity. The approach may change, but the outcome doesn’t.

Cattle Decapitation – Death Atlas
(Death Metal – United States of America)
Metal Blade – 2019/11/25

Love the music. Am awed by the drumming (holy shit). Like the growls. Hate all the other attempts at vocals. It’s so tough to recommend an album that is so good on most levels, but has vocals that sound like Dani Filth with autotune. Maybe I’m being super picky, but their distraction value outweighs the talent of everything else.

Diocletian – Amongst the Flames of a Burning God
(Blackened Death Metal – New Zealand)
Profound Lore – 2019/08/16

Diocletian absolutely brutalise the listener here. War metal is nothing if not direct, but the ruthlessness that is unleashed by these Kiwis is direct in extremis. It tears from a to b to c in a line straight down to Planck scale. There’s no wavering. There is no vacillation. There is no respite. There is naught but furious hatred for all.

Diploid – Glorify
(Grindcore – Australia)
Art as Catharsis – 2019/11/22

Given the bands they name check and the literature they cite in the album’s Bandcamp blurb, it won’t come as a surprise to say Glorify isn’t an easy, accessible listen. But don’t let the elevated difficulty level of the album turn you off. This album yields rich, thoroughly satisfying rewards, but only if you put your shoulder to the yoke.

Life of Agony – The Sound of Scars
(Hard Rock – United States of America)
Napalm Records – 2019/10/11

Mina Caputo is one of music’s great survivors and it shows on The Sound of Scars. It’s an album that takes a lifetime of challenges and presents them with both the immediacy of the lived experience and the perspective of reflection. There’s nothing soft about it either; it’s all high-energy swagger and snarl from go to whoa.

Lingua Ignota – Caligula
(Experimental – United States of America)
Profound Lore – 2019/07/19

Equal parts Swans, Diamanda Galas, and raw black metal, Caligula is a harrowing experience. The unfiltered, unrestrained anger is horrifying. In many ways, I feel like I’m too sheltered to fully appreciate the devastating worldview that Kristin Hayter delivers. Her approach to violence is lived in and all the more terrifying and real as such.

Lord Mantis – Universal Death Church
(Blackened Sludge Metal – United States of America)
Profound Lore – 2019/11/22

With the untimely passing of Bill Baumgardner, and the previous acrimony between Charlie Fell and Andrew Markuszewski, I honestly didn’t expect another Lord Mantis album. But here we are and it’s great. Venomous and poisonous in equal measure, it’s mere existence is a hazard. It heaves vitriol and retches spite with every cursed note.

Nephilim’s Noose – Rites of a Death Merchant
(Death Doom – Canada)
Self-Released – 2019/10/11

As a death doom act, Nephilim’s Noose are supposed to sound monolithic and miserable. And, wow, do they do that. But they further that sound by infusing every cavernous riff with a malign violence; a threat to body and soul that is infectious rather than fearsome. You experience the destruction and you want it even more.

Nocturnus AD – Paradox
(Death Metal – United States of America)
Profound Lore – 2019/05/24

Reviving a classic band with a sequel to a classic album is fraught with risks. Fortunately, Paradox delivers everything that you could want from a follow up to The Key. The riffs are infectious and the scifi vibe is intoxicating. The band has lost absolutely nothing over the years; absolutely killer, high-octane death metal.

Öxxö Xööx – Ÿ
(Doom Metal – France)
Blood Music – 2019/11/29

Once again, Öxxö Xööx has come into my life just when I really needed a healthy dose of melodramatic doom. Ÿ is a rich, almost luxurious sounding album; it really allows and encourages you to wallow in its sumptuous riffs. You need to take the time to truly experience the full extent of all nine tracks, as there is a dark majesty on display throughout.

November 2019 Review Round Up

It’s almost the end of the year and I figured, as a treat to myself, I’d break the mold a little bit and do a label spotlight.

It didn’t really take a lot of mulling over for me to settle on Sentient Ruin Laboratories. They were the first label to ever reach out to me and request I look at their material, so I really do consider them friends of Metalshopped (despite never having met anyone at the label and living on opposite sides of the planet). It also helps that they maintain an excellent standard for their releases. Abstracter, Altarage, Atrament, Friendship, and 夢遊病者 are all amazing bands that I only know about because of Sentient Ruin. And they keep finding bands of similar calibre. It’s uncanny.

So read on and discover some of the best releases from one of metal’s foremost vanguard labels.

As always, I can be contacted via Facebook.

See everyone next month. It’ll be the new year, so it will be best of season.

Buy me a coffee

Album of the Month
Pseudocommando – A Home Beneath the Floorboards
(Harsh Noise – United States of America)
Sentient Ruin Laboratories – 2019/08/23

I’m normally able to use harsh noise as a way to meditate, to scrub the mind of consciousness and simply be. Pseudcommando don’t allow me that luxury. Their take on noise is so aggressive that you can’t escape it. It fills your reality with noise to the point that even the air starts to feel heavy. Embrace your masochism and listen.

The Rest in Alphabetical Order
Black Earth – Gnarled Ritual of Self Annihilation
(Black Ambient – Spain)
Sentient Ruin Laboratories – 2019/09/27

It took me a long time to wrap my head around this. It initially sounds like an impenetrable wall of cold metal. But it clicked. I got it. This is ritual. The album unfolds in movements, but it is all one hadal ritual. The sorcery at its core is dark and this is reflected in its horrific ambience. Brilliant, but not for the faint of heart.

Cthonica – Typhomanteia: Sacred Triarchy of Spiritual Putrefaction
(Blackened Death Doom – Venezuela)
Sentient Ruin Laboratories – 2019/10/25

Blackened death doom should sound like a band is bringing hell with them, as it combines three distinct shades of evil. Cthonica absolutely live up to this, while adding a certain earthiness that all too appropriately goes with their name. This is an album of suffocating weight and lightless depths. It’s music for the damned and rotting.

Hold Me Down – Hold Me Down
(Industrial Metal – United States of America)
Sentient Ruin Laboratories – 2019/04/05

Don’t for one second think this is KMFDM, Ministry, or Rammstein. Hold Me Down do oppressive, anti-human noise and they do it so well. Evocative is what I look for in an album, and this does it in spades. Sure, the image is an infernal, planet-wide factory where humans sweat, toil, and die at the hands of malevolent ai, but it’s very well done.

Imperial Cult – Spasm of Light
(Black Metal – Netherlands)
Sentient Ruin Laboratories – 2019/08/23

I love bands that experiment with form and Imperial Cult is no exception. Spasm of Light is one track of blasting raw black metal stretched out over thirty-odd minutes. The warping effect the persistent assault has on the senses is something worth experiencing. It sucks you in and traps you. Time distorts and leaves you gasping.

Nightfucker – Nightfucker
(Sludge – Canada)
Sentient Ruin Laboratories – 2019/07/12

This is a miserable dirge, suitable for playing at an open casket funeral for someone who died alone and had mostly liquified before being found. It’s real noisome, fetid stuff. Slow and tortuous too. It really puts the sludge back into sludge. Each note is mired in viscous, enervating grime that constantly threatens to envelop you.

Suspiral – Chasm
(Black Metal – Spain)
Sentient Ruin Laboratories – 2019/05/10

Symbolism is one of black metal’s best friends. Why beat the listener over the head, when you can let them beat themselves. Suspiral gets this. Chasm is a yawning lightless abyss of an album; you can plumb its depths, searching but never finding meaning. But that futility is meaningful in and of itself. Purpose and hope are the enemy here.

Sutekh Hexen – Sutekh Hexen
(Black Ambient – United States of America)
Sentient Ruin Laboratories – 2019/03/29

Ominous and unsettling, Sutekh Hexen have put their name to an album that uses ambience as a weapon. It conjures images of howling winds, cutting sleet, sheer crags, and unrelenting bleakness. Otherworldly and esoteric, but still terrifyingly coherent, it’s a madman’s vision of hell put to music. Sends shivers down the spine.

Sutekh Hexen/夢遊病者 – Split

I don’t cover a lot of splits, but when they’re done as well as this, they’re worth a mention. Sutekh Hexen sounds like they’ve taken field recordings from Venus then incorporated them into black metal.夢遊病者 are malevolent and creeping, like they plan violence and it might come soon. Combined, the two tracks come together as one cohesive nightmare.

Previously Reviewed But Worth A Revisit Since It’s A Label Spotlight
Miscarriage – Imminent Horror
(Atmospheric Sludge – United States of America/Sweden)
Sentient Ruin Laboratories – 2019/02/22

image

I know what they were attempting. I know they succeeded. But it’s way outside my comfort levels. It’s the fetishisation of suffering. It’s a perverse, transgressive ritual that starts with erotic vivisection and culminates in a noisome, necrophillic hatefuck. It’s definitely not my sonic kink, but if it’s yours listen to it, watch some Salo, and leave me alone.

夢遊病者 – Ѫ
(Avantgarde Black Metal – Japan)
Sentient Ruin Laboratories – 2019/04/26

Discordant and dissonant, 夢遊病者 have produced an ep that is overwhelming in its auditory assault. It’s a serenade and a lullaby and howl of rage and scream of madness all at once. Schizophrenic in its delivery of a spectrum of emotions, the end result are two tracks of harrowing, terrifying, captivating grandeur.

October 2019 Review Round Up

October was an abbreviated month in terms of volume of reviews. I stand by my decision to spend my music budget on Revocation/Cattle Decapitation tickets instead. See Revocation live whenever you get the chance. Always.

Of the few albums I did buy, Hope Drone were the pick of consistently entertaining lot. It’s an absolutely gripping experience to listen to, because it hits hard as a truck and with a dancer’s grace.

The list season is almost upon us. I know I’ve been banging on about it most of the year, but it’s my favourite part of the critical year. Especially so when the decade is ticking over. The lists are being prepared. If you have an album you’re particularly sold on, hit me up and make your case.

I think November and December are going to be similarly abbreviated. Not a budget thing, just a slow end of year thing. All the more reason to send me suggestions. I can’t be everywhere. Wouldn’t want to be either.

Facebook is still the best place to reach me. Considering getting a Twitter though. Maybe. Perhaps.

See everyone next month. Enjoy.

I Need Caffeine. My God...

Album of the Month
Hope Drone – Void Lustre
(Blackened Sludge – Australia)
Moment of Collapse – 2019/08/30

I listen to Inter Arma for their intense approach to crushing heaviness. I listen to Nachtmystium for their miserable synthesis of the psychedelic and the industrial. Based on Void Lustre, I will continue to listen to Hope Drone, as they have amalgamated these these two distinct sounds into a terrifyingly claustrophobic bad trip.

The Rest in Alphabetical Order
Opeth – In Cauda Venenum
(Progressive Metal – Sweden)
Moderbolaget – 2019/09/27

First things first: listen to the Swedish version; it flows easier than the English one. That distinction aside, what Opeth have delivered isn’t exactly revelatory; it’s more a further polishing of their Heritage-onwards pure-prog efforts. It has everything you should reasonably expect from them these days, but it seems to do it all better.

Swans – Leaving Meaning
(Post-Punk – United States of America)
Young God – 2019/10/25

Michael Gira’s latest incarnation of Swans succeeds at being very different from what came before, but still very much on brand. The almost suffocating density has been replaced with a ritualistic minimalism. Stark, yet eerily beautiful, but also profoundly discomforting, Leaving Meaning isn’t easy to unpack, but is totally worth it.

Teitanblood – The Baneful Choir
(Blackened Death Metal – Spain)
Norma Evangelium Diaboli – 2019/10/18

Welcome to the soundtrack of evil triumphant. Teitanblood have always had the knack for blasting sonic malignance, but The Baneful Choir is something else. They portray a world devoid of light, where hope is a curse, and agony is the only respite from the ever-present realisation that good is dead and gone for the rest of this wretched eternity.

September 2019 Review Round Up

That was a hell of a September. It was a catch up month for Metalshopped, so shout out to the taxman for giving me a nice refund of my own money. It felt good to mostly clear the ol’ shopping list.

You know what else feels good? Listening to Empath. Devin Townsend has unleashed a spectacular, insane hit of joyous ridiculousness. It’s prog without limits.

Also reviewed this month is Blut Aus Nord’s Hallucinogen. Another cracking album for sure, but it should have been included next month. Some dick leaked the album early, so Debemur Morti responded by upping the release date. While it’s nice to have the album early, it’s bullshit that it happened that way. Support content creators; fuck pirates.

The year and the decade are both winding up, but there’s still a hell of a lot of good in the pipes. Got pumped, stay pumped.

As usual, you can hit me up on Facebook. Always happy to hear feedback and suggestions.

See everyone next month.

Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

Album of the Month
Devin Townsend – Empath
(Progressive Metal – Canada)
InsideOut – 2019/03/29

Proving that any emotion delivered stridently enough can provide an intense experience, Empath is a manic blast of over-the-top positivity. The album is an extended love song to existence, and not in the bubblegum, everything-is-awesome sense. This is a shining beacon highlighting the warts and all nature of life in all its glory.

The Rest in Alphabetical Order
01101111011101100110111001101001 – SDSS J0333+0651
(Brutal Death Metal – Antarctica and Mars but actually Argentina)
Amputated Vein – 2019/08/09

I’m ashamed of how much I like this, because, let’s be honest, astronomy slam sounds like the Dunning-Kruger effect put to music. But I don’t think anyone other than the band could have predicted how precise and energetic SDSS would turn out. No lazy interchangeable chug here. There’s not a second of wasted energy; all mosh, no rest.

Abyssal – A Beacon in the Husk
(Death Metal – United Kingdom)
Profound Lore – 2019/06/21

Abyssal continue to be one of the most ably evocative metal acts out there. Like their previous album, Antikatastaseis, A Beacon in the Husk takes me deep into the hell realms of Dante’s Inferno. This time, I’m transported to the Wood of the Suicides. It’s dread. It’s horror. It’s entrapment. It’s the knowledge of damnation at your own hands.

Blut Aus Nord – Hallucinogen
(Progressive Black Metal – France)
Debemur Morti – 2019/09/20

It’s an irritating but necessary pun that best describes Hallucinogen; it’s intoxicating. From its diverse vocal range to its Hendrix-meets-Mayhem melodies, it’s an album that pushes progressive black metal in directions it doesn’t usually go. It challenges expectations and rewards the active listener with its psychedelic visions.

Cloud Rat – Pollinator
(Grindcore – United States of America)
Artoffact – 2019/09/13

Who would have thought grindcore could be so grandiose? So majestic? Dare I say it? Epic. Pollinator is something very special. It’s the vast vista of humanity with all its foibles and tumults, but sped up to the bpm of a stressed hummingbird’s heartbeat and viewed through an obscuring heat shimmer of pure ferocity. A stunning act of musical severity.

Consummation – The Great Solar Hunter
(Blackened Death Metal – Australia)
Profound Lore – 2019/06/07

The fury of the ascendant sun combined with the patience of the greatest hunter; it’s hard to think of a more appropriately named album. Especially since it’s, well, great. It’s always impressive to see a band manage an elevated level of aggression with the forethought and maturity to build up to bigger pay-offs. And this album pays off big time.

Cult of Luna – A Dawn to Fear
(Progressive Metal – Sweden)
Metal Blade – 2019/09/20

Cult of Luna give themselves all the room in the world to craft their music. It’s an expansive approach that yields the dividends they were expecting, as the band’s signature part-progressive, part-post metal sound is given free reign to soar to dizzying acrophobic openness and crunch into claustrophobic oppression. Stirring stuff.

Darkthrone – Old Star
(Blackish Metal – Norway)
Peaceville – 2019/05/31

I love Darkthrone’s “We don’t give a shit; we play what we want” attitude. You couldn’t have an album like Old Star without it. It plays out like Mayhem covering Lynyrd Skynyrd, or maybe vice versa. Oozing with attitude, it’s an album for getting smashed around a camp fire with mates after a hard day of blasphemy and church burning.

Destruction – Born to Perish
(Thrash – Germany)
Nuclear Blast – 2019/08/09

Destruction have to start aiming up. Thrash doesn’t have the luxury of resting on its laurels anymore. To plateau is to stagnate and the genre is littered with albums that, while not bad, fail to inspire because they’re a rehash of what came before. It’s been like that for a long time and these German titans seem to have missed the memo.

Devourment – Obscene Majesty
(Brutal Death Metal – United States of America)
Relapse – 2019/08/16

For a band that has been held up as a pillar of a genre often (self-) described as super ignorant, there’s an awful lot of intelligence packed into these ten songs. Suspiciously melodic passages too. It’s like the band care why their fans are smashing each other to a pulp in the mosh and are trying to give them better reasons to do so.

Fall of Rauros – Patterns in Mythology
(Black Metal – United States of America)
Gilead Media – 2019/07/19

Ordinarily, I tend to use ephemeral as a pejorative. Light weight. Lacking substance. That’s not the case with Patterns in Mythology. It’s ephemeral in the fae, life is fleeting way. It gives the black metal on display a curious otherness; it allows the band to explore airier, more beautiful sounds while still retaining the blackened fire.

Full of Hell – Weeping Choir
(Grindcore – United States of America)
Relapse – 2019/05/17

Full of Hell have tended to land their grindcore firmly in the experimental, avant-garde camp. Very easy to see their talent, not always as easy to enjoy their efforts. Weeping Choir breaks free of this. Still absolutely willing to experiment with grind’s form, but it is delivered as such an all-out assault that all niggling doubts vanish.

Gaahl’s WYRD – GastiR — Ghosts Invited
(Black Metal – Norway)
Season of Mist – 2019/05/31

This feels like an important album. Like there’s another leap forward contained within, up there with Bathory’s early work or Mayhem’s De Mysteriis dom Sathanas. The icy ferocity of the music is matched with a dark poetry that you wouldn’t ordinarily associate with the genre. Gaahl truly is one of this generation’s greatest skålds.

Garsdghastr – Slit Throat Requiem
(Symphonic Black Metal – Sweden/United States of America)
Profound Lore – 2019/04/26

Damn, this is sharp. I don’t expect symphonic black metal to have such a wicked cutting edge to it. But there’s no florid Dimmu-esque melodrama; there is only a ruthless dedication to making the most hellish synth-led racket they possibly can. It serves as an almighty reminder that black metal should, in all its myriad forms, intimidate.

Grand Magus – Wolf God
(Heavy Metal – Sweden)
Nuclear Blast – 2019/04/19

I am, and will remain, a big fan of Grand Magus, but my fandom isn’t so one-eyed that I can’t acknowledge their faults. And vocal delivery is certainly a problem. JB’s vocals don’t have a great deal of range, which is fine when there’s a cornucopia of badass riffs to distract. Wolf God, alas, does not distract. It’s all a bit flat and uninspiring.

Inter Arma – Sulphur English
(Sludge Metal – United States of America)
Relapse – 2019/04/12

Coming across as less cataclysmic and more cathartic, Sulphur English still sounds distinctly like Inter Arma. And, yet, not. Subtle stylistic deviations are the mark of a band expanding their sonic brand. They still build tension deliberately and intensely, but they direct it differently. It’s an organic evolution to their approach to darkness.

Mgła – Age of Excuse
(Black Metal – Poland)
Northern Heritage – 2019/09/02

Complacency is the greatest enemy of consistency. It’s understandable that a band with a distinct sound and approach to their craft might to resistant to change to the own detriment. It’s why Mgła are so impressive. Age of Excuse sounds as fresh and intimidating as Groza did ten years ago. And they’ve sacrificed none of their signature sound along the way.

Mizmor (מזמור) – Cairn
(Blackened Doom Metal – United States of America)
Gilead Media – 2019/09/06

Cairn sounds like an album attempting, but failing, to outrun itself. A great jovian heaviness acts as a gravity well, forever smashing the fevered black metal back to earth and forcing it to crawl at a near drone. It’s a thoroughly entertaining synergy of energy levels, merging the anti-human and the inhuman into one malign force.

Slipknot – We Are Not Your Kind
(Nu-Metal – United States of America)
Roadrunner – 2019/08/09

A fine return to form, Slipknot have moved past the necessarily disjointed Gray Chapter and the terrible Stone Sourness of the previous two albums before that. The band’s sound has matured, maintaining a familiar level of vitriol but has become more expansive, as befits their status as one of metal’s most bankable acts.

Tomb Mold – Planetary Clairvoyance
(Death Metal – Canada)
20 Buck Spin – 2019/07/19

If you’re going to be prolific, you’d better hope you’re good. And the thoroughly restless Tomb Mold are just that. Planetary Clairvoyance breathes fire into every track, making what is essentially an old school album fresh again. This is what happens when a band deeply care about their end product and have the smarts to deliver.

August 2019 Review Round Up

A bit of an abbreviated Metalshopped this month. Had an awful lot of life going on this month. That being said, I thoroughly enjoyed everything on offer.

Best of the lot was Jute Gyte’s latest. I don’t have enough of a theoretical background to dissect the technical talk on the bandcamp page, but I do understand that it is a complicated, intense album that took a lot of talent to pull off.

I should be back to a regular sized Metalshopped next month Facebook.

As always, any suggestions, recommendations, or feedback can be directed to.

Enjoy. See you next month.

Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

Album of the Month
Jute Gyte – Birefringence
(Avantgarde Black Metal – United States of America)
Self-released – 2019/07/01

Jute Gyte have released an album that blasts. Thoroughly. But more impressively, it’s an album that successfully perverts your lived experience. You will hear melodies that you swear are familiar, but they are so twisted and distorted that familiarity is replaced with a creeping unease and a discomforting anxiety. It’s an almost profound experience.

The Rest in Alphabetical Order
Follower – Lost
(Ambient Drone – United States of America)
Apollo’s Crotch – 2019/04/25

There’s a surprising commitment to variation on this album. And, to their credit, it’s not a distraction. The soothing keyboards, the lilting accoustic guitars, the crashing waves of noise: they create an atmosphere built on anxiety and trepidation, but delivers a calming satisfaction. A nuanced and sophisticated display.

Jesusegg – The Second Coming
(Grindcore – United States of America)
Seeing Red – 2019/07/26

Jesusegg remain one of grind acts I continue to get excited about. I love the genre, but truly great acts are rarer than I would like. They manage to buck this trend by being hyper-aggressive, but in a way that juxtaposes a Discordance Axis-esque disregard for form with a Blood Duster-esque irreverence. It invigorates you right to the core.

Mylingar – Döda Själar
(Blackened Death Metal – Sweden)
Amor Fati – 2018/08/02

If you want savagery, you got it. Döda själar is as catastrophic as a tornado made of blades, and it’s about as subtle too. Don’t mistake the lack of subtlety for a lack of intelligence though. It’s as sharp as the aforementioned blades. Mylingar are playing the part of the archetypal evil sorcerer, conjuring vile spells to rain destruction.

Oxidase Nightmare – Contorting the Infinitiated Forms
(Death Grind – United States of America)
Apollo’s Crotch – 2019/08/08

It starts off blistering, but then it got real weird. It sounds very much like a techdeath band decided to make an ambient album with grindcore tempos. It’s only about six minutes long, but it goes places you will not anticipate. Constantly shifting, they have produced a form of sonic terrorism that doesn’t allow anyone to get comfortable.

Pharmakeia – Pharmakeia
(Black Metal – Parts Unknown)
Amor Fati – 2019/07/25

This is anti-cosmic black metal at its absolute heaviest. I know modern astrophysics doesn’t subscribe to the big crunch model of universe death, but should it exist, then Pharmakeia are doing their best to emulate its sonic reverberation. Cataclysmic in approach, this is a band harnessing destruction as the apex physical force.

July 2019 Review Round Up

Another July been and gone. Thankfully it left behind some gold. I was starting to worry about it being a year of good releases not great releases.

The absolute best was Spirit Adrift’s Divided by Darkness. Holy shit, that is a fun album to listen to. Almost completely derailed my month because it’s all I wanted to listen to. It still is to be honest, but I pushed through.

Not much else to say this month. It’s been a month where life has been a little bit in the way of music, but that happens.

Hit me with feedback, suggestions, or recommendations on Facebook.

See everyone next month.

Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

Album of the Month
Spirit Adrift – Divided by Darkness
(Heavy Metal – United States of America)
20 Buck Spin – 2019/05/10

This is a rollicking good time. It’s as heavy as some of the greats of modern US doom, but it’s played at a much faster tempo. The vocals are delivered with an intensity usually reserved for the Georgian sludge masters, but they’re clean as a mountain spring. There’s so much to like here. They’ve forged a path to greatness and paved it with talent.

The Rest in Alphabetical Order
Aggressor Id – Aggressor Id
(Grindcore – United States of America)
Self-released – 2019/01/07

Grind with enough touches of slam and metalcore to trick me into thinking it’s pv. Not complaining though. Each track seems to mimic the ebb and flow of a different violent outburst. It flares and seethes, then goes cold and festers. It covers the full range of anger with a fluency that tells of intimacy with the emotion born of experience.

An Isolated Mind – I’m Losing Myself
(Black Metal – United States of America)
I, Voidhanger – 2019/03/16

When your standard black metal act deals with isolation, it tends to be in the “Behold! The tundra!” sense. An Isolated Mind comes at it from the social sense and, in doing so, have encapsulated musically the bleak despair and burgeoning madness of being persistently alone despite being surrounded by a sea of humanity. Uncomfortable yet rewarding.

Enforcer – Zenith
(Heavy Metal – Sweden)
Nuclear Blast – 2019/04/26

Enforcer have always been a bit on the lurid side: flashy, fast, and ridiculous. So you wouldn’t think them glamming things up a bit would change a whole lot. But it did. And I’m not sure how I feel about it. Zenith comes across as a mash up of Ghost and Motley Crue, and as much as I’m a fan of both, it’s an odd combo. I enjoy it, but it’s definitely distracting.

False – Portent
(Progressive Black Metal – United States of America)
Gilead Media – 2019/07/12

Listening to black metal has exposed me to all sorts of weird stuff, but I first got into it because of the absolute majesty of Emperor. It’s a sensation I don’t often find in the genre anymore. But I found it in False. Portent is heavy on grandeur; it’s three extended tracks allow for many a dramatic swell. I’m completely awestruck.

Friendship – Undercurrent
(Powerviolence – Japan)
Southern Lord – 2019/06/17

Undercurrent sounds sinister. Terrifyingly so. It’s heavy and aggressive, for sure, but it’s strength lies in its tension. It’s like limping away from an arse-kicking, only to get that nagging feeling that your assailants are still there, following. Watching. It’s an album that speaks of malice past, present, and future.

Lice – Woe Betide You
(Blackgaze – Spain/Sweden)
Season of Mist – 2019/05/10

When I heard Teitanblood and Kvarforth (of Shining infamy) were collaborating, I honestly didn’t expect sad and angry Alcest. It’s an odd sort of outcome. Kvarforth is definitely still channelling his tortured self, but the music is tonally weird. Not necessarily bad; it seems designed to never let the listener find comfort. Maliciously arcane.

Nucleus – Entity
(Death Metal – United States of America)
Unspeakable Axe – 2019/06/14

A for concept; C, C+ for execution. Old school death with a peppermill twist of tech is a pretty solid idea for keeping the sound fresh. But I can’t shake the feeling this is sonic porridge. I’m sure some people will take enjoyment, nourishment, and comfort from it; but for me it’s just a little bit stodgy and dull. Not bad, but hard to recommend.

Rammstein –
(Neue Deutsche Härte – Germany)
Universal – 2019/05/17

What to make of Rammstein’s technically untitled seventh album? Is it worth the decade of waiting? Is it a suitable swansong should, as I suspect, they break up completely and finally? To answer: it’s great, mostly, and yes. More electronic leaning than I expected, it keens closest to Herzeleid but with a defter touch. A circle well closed.

Redbait – Cages
(Hardcore – United States of America)
New Age Records – 2019/06/14

While I am very appreciative of the uptick in proudly left hardcore, there is still an interplay between message and delivery that needs to be balanced. Redbait have a cogent and poignant message, but bury it beneath a delivery so furious that much of it gets lost. I don’t expect the band to play nice; it would just be nice the anger sounded more directed.

June 2018 Review Round Up

Halfway through the year already. Hasn’t time flown past?

June was another month that fell into the surprisingly busy category. I went in expecting, for several reasons, to only have maybe five reviews. More than doubled that. Pretty happy about that to be honest.

Album of the month belongs justly to the unstoppable thrash machine that is Death Angel. A startlingly consistent band to begin with, it wasn’t a huge surprise that they put out more gold. But that it was this gleaming? Didn’t truly call that.

Lots of other good stuff too, plus the return of the transcendently bad review. Always fun.

A gig free month for me. Sad, but inevitable. There’s always later in the year.

As always, you can reach me via Facebook.

See you next month.

Enjoy.

Buy Me Caffeine at ko-fi.com

Album of the Month
Death Angel – Humanicide
(Thrash – United States of America)
Nuclear Blast – 2019/05/31

You want Bay Area thrash these days? You want Death Angel. Humanicide is one of their strongest showings in their long career. It’s blisteringly fast. It’s unabashedly rabble rousing. And it’s easily the most memorable of their albums. They have penned an album of thrash anthems that will absolutely stay fresh and loud in your mind.

The Rest in Alphabetical Order
Alphanumeric – Condemnation of Memory
(Grindcore – United States of America)
Self-released – 2019/06/01

Don’t let the fact this is grindcore (and a particularly incendiary version of the genre at that) fool you; the primary emotion on display here isn’t anger. It’s despair. They have expressed a worldview so bleak and futile that it’s impossible to not be affected by it. As it cuts to the core of human failure, you will feel the incisions.

Baroness – Gold & Grey
(Progressive Sludge – United States of America)
Abraxan Hymns – 2019/06/14

Is it just me, or is there something wrong with the levelling on this otherwise fine album? It was a complaint levelled at Purple too, but it seems so much worse this time around. It’s an hour of soulful, engaging music, but without serious tweaks to your equaliser, it’s a tough listen. Great if you have the patience. Not so much if not.

Brain Bleed – Automated Eradication
(Slamgrind – United States of America)
Self-released – 2019/06/07

It’s a controversial opinion in my social circle, but I love grind with breakdowns and, in Brain Bleed’s case, slams. There’s something about the primal call to headbang that the slowdowns generate that blends perfectly with the manic fury of blasting grindcore. This burst gets right into the lizard brain and stirs shit up.

Imprecation – Damnatio Ad Bestias
(Death Metal – United States of America)
Dark Descent – 2019/03/22

Imprecation unleash their death metal like an even more feral early Roadrunner-era Deicide; their sound isn’t so much brutal, as it is pure evil. There’s nothing esoteric here; assault and battery take the place of ritual, as ultimately the blood that flows is all the same and always welcomed by those who lurk in the shadows of this reality.

Kūka’ilimoku – Kūka’ilimoku
(Raw Black Metal – Hawaii)
Self-released – 2019/05/29

As far as raw black metal goes, this is raw. But, and I hesitate to mention it given the band’s existence is a hostile reaction to Anglo-American oppression of Hawaiian Polynesian culture, there’s an almost surf rock vibe to it. This does so much to separate the band from the standard death by frostbite sound that raw black metal usually peddles.

Misþyrming – Algleymi
(Black Metal – Iceland)
Norma Evangelium Diaboli – 2019/05/24

For a genre that strongly purports the “You are your own God” worldview, black metal can be very restrictive. Pick a lane and stick to it tends to be the creative ethos. Algleymi bucks this trend by seamlessly incorporating various black metal styles into the one album. It’s melodic. It’s post. It’s punk. It’s avant. It’s brilliant.

Possessed – Revelations of Oblivion
(Death Thrash – United States of America)
Nuclear Blast – 2019/05/10

With a layover between albums of over 30 years, a bit of concern about performance rust is valid. But let me assure you, Possessed are every bit as vital in 2019 as they were in the 80s. Revelations hits like a heavyweight but moves like a cruiserweight. Their classic amalgamation of thrash and death metal fully retains its brilliance.

Skáphe + Wormlust – Kosmískur Hryllingur
(Black Metal – United States of America + Iceland)
Mystískaos – 2019/06/06

I don’t cover a lot of collaborations, but Skáphe and Wormlust teaming up is worth the print. As far as avant-garde black metal goes, this isn’t so much mind-bending but mind-breaking. They’ve combined their already considerable abilities to headfuck a listener and unleashed a swirling, claustrophobic nightmare.

Sunn O))) – Life Metal
(Drone – United States of America)
Southern Lord – 2019/04/26

Life Metal makes it sound like this album is an affirmation of positivity. Nope. It’s more because the dead can’t feel the tension and anxiety these drones inspire. It’s Sunn O)))’s best work this decade for exactly that reason. The noise permeates the body and the brain, and then starts to mess with them. You don’t listen to this; you experience it.

Throat Ditch – Throat Ditch
(Fastcore – United States of America)
Self-released – 2019/06/15

Throat Ditch’s take on fastcore is hardcore that’s all fight and no think. Even with the lulls, samples, and other assorted quiet moments, this is an ep that puts aggression front, centre, and lit up with spotlights. And it’s all the better for it. It has a singularity of purpose that brokers no compromise to its overall vision.

Ulcerated Offal – Wipe Out
(Goregrind – Russia)
Self-released – 2019/05/13

I hate this so much I have trouble fathoming it. The production is muddier than anything I have ever heard. The “songs” are virtually indistinguishable. It hurts to listen to. But all of these are deliberate and considered stylistic choices. It’s a hard push into noise. It’s virtually unlistenable and I hate it so much, I begrudgingly respect it.