Albums of the Decade 2010-2019, Part 4 (10 – 1)

Here we are. The best ten albums to see release between the years 2010 and 2019. These are the sort of albums that will appeal to any metalhead, regardless of usual genre preferences. Classics. All of them.

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10) Skeletal Remains – Devouring Mortality
Dark Descent – 2018

You could crack your neck headbanging to it. You could dislocate fingers trying to emulate its solos. It’s brutal without ignorant chug. It’s technical without gratuitous fret masturbation. And at all times it remains as old school as a slate chalkboard. This album single-handedly gives me hope for the death metal genre. Every year puts up good albums. Sometimes even a great one surfaces. But I was worried that the days of the mind-meltingly phenomenal were gone. This allays all my fears.

9) Bliss Signal – Bliss Signal
Profound Lore – 2018

You won’t find a more satisfyingly immersive listening experience. The successful combination of evocative black metal with the primal electric hum of grime results in an almost trance-inducing state. It’s an album that pushes the limits of its stylistic roots far past expectations; it’s as far as removed from Mayhem as it is from Dizzee Rascal. But in finding this previously undiscovered musical niche, Bliss Signal have become a will-o-the-wisp, irresistibly luring us far off the beaten path.

8) Spirit Adrift – Divided by Darkness
20 Buck Spin – 2019

Divided by Darkness has some of the most infectious riffs ever put to wax; a rhythmic pathogen with truly pandemic potential. Spirit Adrift sit right on that cusp between true heavy metal and epic doom metal, so they’re able to get huge sounding guitars that move with implacable purpose but are able to simultaneously linger and luxuriate. I’m not sure exactly how it’s possible for one album to be both immoveable object and irresistible force, but this legendary juggernaut is absolutely both.

7) Prurient – Frozen Niagara Falls
Profound Lore – 2015

Channelling the long held ascetic notion of transcendence through suffering, Prurient’s ninety minute monster of an album stretches the limits of what can rightfully be considered noise to deliver sixteen tracks that cleanse the soul with fire then clad it in glorious white. The looped synths, heavy distortion, and screeching feedback allow the listener to enter a truly meditative state, despite being absolutely and unrepentantly punishing to the ears. Challenging and almost overwhelming, yet wondrously sublime.

6) SubRosa – More Constant tham the Gods
Profound Lore – 2013

I struggle to think of any other band in the stoner doom world that operates at the level of sophistication that SubRosa does. They present emotionally challenging themes without dumbing down their real world complexity. And rather than just plucking the heartstrings and letting it reverb, the band dare to fill their scores with as much life musically as they have thematically. This is an album that was great on release, but has aged spectacularly because of the dynamism the band challenged themselves to play.

5) Daughters – You Won’t Get What You Want
Ipecac – 2018

What is immediately clear here is that when Daughters decided to do a new album, their original shouty, jarring brand of noise rock wouldn’t cut it anymore. What they delivered is swooning, anxious, complicated, and absolutely enthralling. It’s an album that understands, at a fundamental level, all the things that scratch and irritate the psyche. As such, you can’t exactly call it a comfortable listen, but it’s almost impossible to turn off. It’s a masterpiece of emotive songwriting.

4) Devin Townsend – Empath
InsideOut – 2019

What we have here is prog at its most organic sounding. In many respects this comes across as a stream of febrile consciousness. All the transitions, exclamations, and assorted oddities flow into each other and somehow make total sense. It’s like Devin is channelling his inner James Joyce and this is his Ulysses. Don’t underestimate the strangeness; Devin has pushed his sound far out to sea on this. But as overwhelming as it can sound, the raw and joyous humanity on display will fill you with light.

3) Ihsahn – Àmr
Candlelight – 2018

In what may well be the best album he has ever done, Ihsahn has delivered a bleakly captivating dissertation on isolation, loneliness, and depression. There are moments that genuinely cut deep into the soul, where the emptiness at the core of existence is so clear and unquestionable that it hurts. The challenging themes are backed up with a progressive score that is free-wheeling and compelling; it demands to be heard, but its arrogance is well-deserved and hard-earned.

2) Triptykon – Eparistera Daimones
Century Media – 2010

The acrimonious break up of Celtic Frost is the fuel that feeds this raging inferno. I know that Thomas Fischer is on the record about needing a certain level of discord in his life to get the most out of his creativity, but I didn’t think that it was humanly possible for one man to hate as deeply as he does. This is more than simple invective; this is an invocation of anger so profound that if magic were real, a certain former drummer would cease to exist. It’s power is stunning and transcendent on all levels.

1) Cobalt – Slow Forever
Profound Lore – 2016

“In such condition there is no place for industry, because the fruit thereof is uncertain, and consequently no culture of the earth, no navigation nor the use of commodities that may be imported by sea, no commodious building, no instruments of moving and removing such things as require much force, no knowledge of the face of the earth, no account of time, no arts, no letters, no society, and which is worst of all, continual fear and danger of violent death, and the life of man, solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short.”
– Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan (1651)

Hobbes was making his case for a mighty ruler by bleakly positing what he considered the natural state of mankind. He genuinely believed that strong, unified control would alleviate this brutish state of nature. However, even if you subscribe to this vision of totalitarian necessity, you also have to acknowledge that life isn’t that simple. Humanity falls through cracks in society all the time. Cobalt understand this; that even in this society we have built to shelter us from ourselves, it’s all too common for people to slip through, to re-enter the state of nature. Slow Forever is replete with a grubby, grasping desperation that is absolutely terrifying because of its raw humanity. This is music of the lost, of the outsider, of people stripped of all but existence. Its struggles are visceral and its desires are violent. It exposes the uncomfortable truth that society is the lie we tell ourselves to hide our all too animal nature from each other. Listen to this and feed your beast.

September 2016 Review Round Up

An abbreviated review collection this month. Metalshopped’s hard earned cash was geared towards live music this month. How could I turn down tickets to Enslaved, Opeth, Meshuggah, etc? They’re not going to see themselves, now are they?

That being said, there was some absolute gold this month. SubRosa’s phenomenal For This We Fought the Battle of Ages ran first with distance for second. Other albums this month were good, even great; but SubRosa stood apart.

Insomnium’s colossal one track album, Winter’s Gate, more than deserved its honourable mention. Listening to what is traditionally a melodeath band put out such a complicated slab of prog is very satisfying.

As usual, feel free to hit me up on Facebook. Especially if you’ve got a release you think is worth a listen.

Until next month
\m/

Album of the Month
SubRosa – For This We Fought the Battle of Ages
(Doom metal – United States of America)
Profound Lore Records – 2016/08/26

In doom circles, SubRosa has always been in a league of their own, but this album sees them push out even further. It’s a perfect combination of ethereal vocals, surprisingly technical guitars, and lyrics that delve deeply into uncomfortable truths. Here is the beauty in despair; here is death’s loving embrace.
Try before you buy: Despair is a Siren (Bandcamp)

Honourable Mention
Insomnium – Winter’s Gate
(Progressive death metal – Finland)
Century Media – 2016/09/23

This is what I like to see; a prog band actually taking a calculated risk to progress themselves as a band. The album’s one track runs for forty minutes, but it uses that time well. In a literal sense, it tells a story. A damn good one. But it’s their music that fleshes out the drama. Riveting.
Try before you buy: the first ten minutes should provide ample introduction. (YouTube)

The Rest in Alphabetical Order
Oranssi Pazuzu – Värähtelijä
(Psychedelic black metal – Finland)
20 Buck Spin/Svart Records – 2016/02/26

Your average psychedelic black metal album is the result of taking a load of hallucinogens and embracing the darkness. Oranssi Pazuzu aims to break the mold with Värähtelijä. This is an album that sounds like it’s supposed to be the drug. Its ebbs and flows worm their way into the cracks in your psyche. It wants to alter you. It almost succeeds.
Try before you buy: Saturaatio (Bandcamp)

Schammasch – Triangle
(Black metal – Switzerland)
Prosthetic Records – 2016/04/29

Put some time aside, because at three discs, Triangle needs some time to get acquainted. Humming with monastic contemplation and possessed of a Behemoth-esque fervour, this triple album challenges you to think and rewards you with intensity. There’s something almost perverse about something so austere sounding so lavish.
Try before you buy: Awakening from the Dream of Life (Bandcamp)

Sumac – What One Becomes
(Post-metal – United States of America)
Thrill Jockey – 2016/06/10

This isn’t a bold splash into new territory, which some may see as disappointing. Not me though, because what it does is continue on from where The Deal left off. This isn’t an endnote or an unnecessary sequel; this is an album born of the same creative impetus that gave us one of 2015’s better albums.
Try before you buy: Clutch of Oblivion (Bandcamp)

Tombs – All Empires Fall
(Post-black metal – United States of America)
Relapse Records – 2016/04/01

What Tombs does better than pretty well any other post-black act is subtlety. They blast and howl. They swoon and meditate. This isn’t unusual for the genre. It’s how they incorporate the extremes of style in such an organic, almost imperceptible way that is. An uncannily expert performance.
Try before you buy: Deceiver (Bandcamp)